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Landmarks Tuesday, February 6, 2018

One Ton of Ice & Clowns on Skis

In the 1930s, Madison Square Garden was transformed into a winter wonderland for the Winter Sports Show. Real snow and ice blanketed the area where spectators witnessed “a host of new and nerve-pulsating events” like ski jumping, slalom and cross-country skiing, snowshoeing, “fancy” ice skating, and dog sledding.
Urban Tastes Wednesday, January 31, 2018

Skating and Romance

Skating in New York City has long held a romantic allure. Learn about the history of amorous escapades on the ice in the city!
Movements and Causes Wednesday, January 10, 2018

From Harlem to Hanoi: Dr. King and the Vietnam War

We look back at Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s controversial sermon opposing the Vietnam War at Riverside Church in Morningside Heights. Several photographs from the Museum’s collection provide a glimpse into King’s antiwar stance and New York’s role as a key site of activism around the war.
Behind-the-Scenes Monday, January 1, 2018

Fantastic Fans

The hand fans in the Museum's collection are exceptional not only for their beauty, but also for the rich history behind them. Check out the fascinating stories of five fans.
City Artifacts Monday, November 20, 2017

The Miracle at Macy’s — the Musical!

Here’s Love, a musical retelling of Miracle on 34th Street, recreated the spectacle of the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade on stage. Read about the production, and check out some of the original costume designs from our theater collection.
Notable New Yorkers Wednesday, November 15, 2017

Sophie Tucker: The Last of the Red Hot Mammas

Ukraine-born singer Sophie Tucker burst onto the New York City theater scene in the early 1900s. During her 50-year career, she befriended and worked with many larger-than-life figures like Judy Garland, Frank Sinatra, and Irving Berlin.
Notable New Yorkers Wednesday, November 1, 2017

Remembering Mel Rosenthal

Mel Rosenthal—photographer, educator, activist, and friend of the Museum of the City of New York—recently passed away. We remember the life of this notable New Yorker.
City Arts Thursday, October 26, 2017

Salsa on Stage

Rhythm & Power: Salsa in New York digs into salsa’s history as an art form and social movement. Our Theater Collection curator takes a look at how that movement translated and transferred on stage.
Movements and Causes Tuesday, October 3, 2017

What Is DACA, and How Does it Affect New Yorkers?

One of the five challenges explored in the Future City Lab’s “Living Together” section addresses New York City’s diversity, reflected in its demographics, culture, cuisine, and entrepreneurial spirit. See how the repeal of DACA will impact NYC.
City Arts Tuesday, September 26, 2017

When Love Comes so Strong

If you know the story of Romeo and Juliet, you know the story of West Side Story. Read about the creative forces behind the musical and its lasting legacy.
Behind-the-Scenes Tuesday, September 19, 2017

The Hunt

What happens when an object's lender can't be found? Read the bittersweet story about how a registrar tracked down the doll's rightful owner 30 years later.
City Artifacts Monday, September 11, 2017

Civil Defense During the Cold War

See how New Yorkers prepared for a nuclear attack during the Cold War through objects in the Museum’s Manuscripts and Ephemera collection, including a 1950s-era Civil Defense kit.
Behind-the-Scenes Wednesday, August 23, 2017

Summer at the Museum

Education intern Stephanie Luciano describes what she learned about herself while teaching kids at the Museum this summer.
City Artifacts Tuesday, July 25, 2017

Presenting, the Ephemera Collection

The Museum is pleased to announce the completion of Illuminating New York City History through Material Culture, the National Endowment for the Humanities-funded project to process, catalog, digitize, and rehouse the Ephemera collections.
Behind-the-Scenes Monday, June 12, 2017

The Sounds of Patriotism

Posters weren’t the only form of propaganda during the Great War. We take a look at how music in the United States was inspired by the war in Europe.
Behind-the-Scenes Tuesday, May 30, 2017

The Life Cycle of a Loan

Follow the journey an object takes when borrowed by another institution—from conservation and shipping to deinstallation and its return home.
Behind-the-Scenes Tuesday, March 21, 2017

Onward, oyster!

The oyster is one of over 70 characters brought to life by state-of-the-art interactive technology in New York at Its Core. We follow a group that are working to bring oysters back to New York's harbor.
City Arts Tuesday, March 7, 2017

Dance Culture in NYC

The vibrant history of New York City’s diverse dance culture is explored through a unique course for youth.
Landmarks Thursday, February 16, 2017

The New Colossus

How the poem that gave us the iconic verse, “Give me your tired, your poor, Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free,” made the Statue of Liberty a symbol of immigration and refuge.
Behind-the-Scenes Friday, January 27, 2017

I Spy: A journey of discovery through photography

Photographs in the Museum's collection shine a light on New York City's diversity. In our I Spy classes school students dive into the collection to learn about photography from the masters, and then head out into the city to develop their own creative eye.
Movements and Causes Thursday, January 19, 2017

Gloria Steinem

Feminist pioneer Gloria Steinem joins us for a walk through New York at Its Core, and a discussion on feminism, freedom, and the future.
Landmarks Tuesday, December 20, 2016

Restaurants of Yore

It’s harder and harder for an independent restaurant to survive in New York City. Here we look back at restaurants that enjoyed a successful run in our city.
Notable New Yorkers Tuesday, November 29, 2016

Clement Clarke Moore and Santa in the City

Many people know Clement Clarke Moore (1779-1863) as influential in the popularization of Santa Claus in America with his verse “A Visit from St. Nicholas.” However, he was also an important New Yorker in his own right.
Behind-the-Scenes Tuesday, October 25, 2016

Civil Rights in Brooklyn

A behind the scenes peek into the making of New York at its Core and some of the Civil Rights Era artifacts that will be on view in the exhibition.
Behind-the-Scenes Tuesday, October 18, 2016

Listening to Gay Gotham

One of the challenges in creating history exhibitions is bringing the voices of its featured personalities to life. Gay Gotham curators Stephen Vider and Donald Albrecht found a unique way to do that by working with actors to perform readings of the works of Richard Bruce Nugent and Mercedes de Acosta, featured on audio stations in the exhibition.
Behind-the-Scenes Tuesday, October 11, 2016

The Future City Lab

Introducing The Future City Lab, a new space where visitors will explore solutions for various challenges the city faces.
City Arts Tuesday, September 6, 2016

Louis Bouché, The Stettheimer Dollhouse and Mama’s Boy

Peer inside the Stettheimer Dollhouse at the Museum of the City of New York, and you’ll find a host of tiny works of art. Many of these works have the stamp of renowned artists of the 1920s, but curators are still tracing down the inspiration for others. Recently, Bruce Weber discovered the source for one in a life-size gallery upstate.
Behind-the-Scenes Tuesday, August 2, 2016

The Apple Peeler and Corer

High on a shelf of the legendary Russ & Daughters Appetizing store was an object that perfectly encapsulated the story of New York at Its Core, and a tool that helped launch a 100-year old business.
Behind-the-Scenes Tuesday, May 31, 2016

A View of Melrose

On a hot August afternoon last summer, I left the office early and caught the 5 train north. My objective was to locate the site of the Ursuline Convent in what had once been the rural village of Melrose, and was now the heart of the South Bronx.
Landmarks Tuesday, August 18, 2015

Hot Dog!

Franks, weenies, coneys, dogs, ketchup, kraut, chili; the contested history of the classic American finger food.
City Arts Tuesday, July 1, 2014

The Ziegfeld Midnight Frolic

It’s a sweltering July evening in 1915 and the lights have just come up after the finale of a Ziegfeld Follies show at the New Amsterdam Theatre on 42nd Street. You dread walking out into the muggy night and long for a cool escape. But you’re in luck tonight because it’s the premiere of Flo Ziegfeld Jr.’s new revue, the Danse de Follies!
Notable New Yorkers Tuesday, August 6, 2013

Vanderbilt Ball

In the spring of 1883, the solemnity of Lent didn’t stand a chance against the social event on the mind of all of New York’s elite society: Mrs. W. K. Vanderbilt’s fancy dress ball.
Landmarks Thursday, July 11, 2013

Ghosts of the 6 Train

New York City’s vast transit system is in a constant state of flux, expanding to fill the needs of underserved areas and simultaneously contracting due to budget cuts or obsolescence. Abandoned subway stations across the city remind us of how transit has changed over the years.
Landmarks Tuesday, May 1, 2012

Mott Haven Historic District

Explore the history of Mott Haven, the first neighborhood in the Bronx to receive a historic district designation from the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission.
City Arts Tuesday, April 24, 2012

Riding the Subway with Stanley Kubrick

As most New Yorkers know, the subway system is the lifeline of New York City. In 1946 Stanley Kubrick set out as a staff photographer for LOOK Magazine to capture the story of New York City’s subway commuters.
Landmarks Tuesday, September 6, 2011

23 Skidoo

Today crowds gather around the Flatiron Building to admire its architecture and place in New York history, but back in the early part of the 20th century, men gathered there for a vastly different reason.
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